The Girl on the Train sets new benchmarks

Hawkins’ novel sold 7,280 copies last week, to keep its top position in original fiction, almost double the second-placed Pretty Girls, by Karin Slaughter. Publisher Transworld said that it has sold more than 800,000 copies since The Girl on the Train was published in January.

A record set six years ago by Dan Brown’s The Lost Symbol was broken this week by Paula Hawkins’s dark thriller The Girl on the Train.

Brown’s Robert Langdon thriller, set in Washington DC amid a world of Masonic secrets, held the No 1 slot in hardback fiction for a record-breaking 19 weeks when it was first published in 2009. Even JK Rowling’s first adult novel The Casual Vacancy, and her crime novels written as Robert Galbraith, failed to reach Brown’s 19-week marker. But Hawkins’s novel, in which a commuter inveigles her way into the lives of a couple she has watched daily from her train, believing something dreadful has happened to them, has just done so, after sitting in the top spot in Nielsen BookScan’s hardback fiction charts for the 20th week in a row, the longest stretch since the book sales monitor’s records began.

Hawkins’ novel sold 7,280 copies last week, to keep its top position in original fiction, almost double the second-placed Pretty Girls, by Karin Slaughter. Publisher Transworld said that it has sold more than 800,000 copies since The Girl on the Train was published in January.

Read the complete story at The Girl on the Train.

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